Wednesday, December 31, 2008

Dianne Garrett reports on Angel Food Ministries, Whitehall Church of the Nazarene.

Angel Food is not just a cake. Pastor Rodney Kuhn of the Church of the Nazarene in Whitehall, visited Eastside News Round-Up on WCRX-LP December 24 to explain Angel Food Ministries.

Angel Food is a non-profit, non-denominational food program dedicated to providing food assistance to families across America. They provide boxes of food consisting of high quality items at substantial savings. Angel Food was started in 1994 by Pastor Joe Wingo and his family in a small rural town in north east Georgia. Their mission was to help out local neighbors during an economic downturn. Today, Angel Food helps close to 500,000 families every month with their food needs.


Angel Food partners with churches and community organizations in over 35 states. The goal is to reach out to anyone in need. There are no applications or pre-qualifiers to participate. Angel Food works closely with the USDA, and is one of the only programs of its kind to accept food stamps.

The organization's motto is "Angel Food provides a blessing in every box. It's a hand up...not a hand out!"

The Whitehall church, located at 739 S. Yearling Road, started their program in July. The first month they had 49 customers with an increase to 130 the following month. It is currently up to about 350 being served. Each box has $60 worth of food, but only costs the consumer $30, and there are specialty boxes available, as well.

Orders can be made online at www.angelfoodministries.com, but if paying by cash, money order or food stamps, you must go to your order/pickup location to pre-pay. Credit cards and debit cards are also accepted, and can be used when ordering online. January orders are due by Sunday, January 11, and must be picked up January 17 between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.

Special boxes are available when a regular $30 box is purchased. The following is the January menu:

Oatmeal Variety Box
4 lbs. Chicken leg quarters
1.5 lbs. Beef patties (four 6 oz.)
18 oz. Cheese filled manicotti
2 lb. Pork rib strips
1 lb. Chicken breast fajita strips
1 lb. Ground turkey
1 lb. Broccoli
1 lb. Peas
32 oz. 2% Shelf stable milk (needs no refrigeration)
1.5 lb. Ribeye steak (four 6 oz.)
8 oz. Blueberry muffin mix
12 ct. White corn tortillas
1 lb. Pinto beans
7 oz. Chicken flavored rice and vermicelli
1 doz. Eggs
1 Dessert item

Senior Convenience Box ($28)
Ten nutritionally balanced, fully cooked meals:

New Orleans style chicken
Grilled chicken strips and penne pasta
Beef and bow tie pasta
Flame broiled Salisbury steak
Cheesy chicken and broccoli casserole
Classic chicken tetrazzini
Country fried steak
Spaghetti with meatballs
Chicken parmesan
Flame broiled beef patty
10 Desserts

Special boxes (not shown) are also available for $20-$21 each, but remember a regular $30 box must be purchased, too.



To find a participating location near you, log on to the aforementioned web site. If in the Whitehall area, call the church office at 231-6547.


Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Dianne Garrett.

Dianne's Recipe Page. Cranberry Pie.

Cranberry Pie
(makes 8 servings)

There are still plenty of fresh cranberries in stores, and they aren't just for sauce and relish any more. Try this cranberry pie recipe. I love it! The flavor reminds you of a sweet and tart cherry or rhubarb pie.

2 refrigerated pie crusts
1 cup of sugar
2 tablespoon vanilla (I prefer double strength)
1 teaspoon all purpose flour
3 cups fresh cranberries (two bags)

Preheat oven to 350. Remember to rub a little flour on the bottom of the bottom crust if using the refrigerated roll-out kind.

Mix sugar and flour. Add vanilla, and mix until evenly distributed.

Put cranberries into crust. Sprinkle sugar mixture over berries. Place second crust on top, crimping (or trimming and crimping). Don't forget to make slits in the top for venting.

Bake 35-40 minutes until golden brown. Depends on oven...I bake mine close to an hour.

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Dianne Garrett.

Tuesday, December 23, 2008

Editorial collective critique of management at Bexley Public Radio.

They cannot manage their own lives, yet they may bully to manage yours. These are the dysfunctional managers at Bexley Public Radio.

Executives at Bexley Public Radio have noticed that managers and middle managers at this young broadcast powerhouse are focused on managing, even micro-managing, the details, getting things done, accomplishing the strategic broadcast plan and meeting the audience goals of the organization; but significantly, most of these managers have lost their connections with the people they supervise.

While the success of Bexley Public Radio is an admirable achievement, during that process, dysfunctional managers tended to alienate volunteer staff and the broadcast partners on 102.1 FM. Sadly, some of Bexley Public Radio managers may have lost connection with their families as these managers worked to achieve excellence for the organization and the Bexley community.

Traits of the Dysfunctional Manager at the Radio Station


Their personal backgrounds and experiences may have included separation or divorce, strained family relationships or alienation from children, smoking and or battling obesity or anorexia; yet, they have been successful in meeting the goals of the radio station.

This is an interesting paradox that demands exploration.

How can individuals who are not focused on the people they manage, the opposite of the servant leaders who preceded them, succeed in the 21st Century? The answer appears to lie in their organizational successes, the short-term financial and strategic results they can engender, often at the cost of employee or associate engagement, the watchword of the later 20th Century.


A 2007 study released by the San Francisco-based Employment Law Alliance, as reported by the Society for Human Resource Management in an HRMagazine May 1, 2007 article, “Study: Bully Bosses Prevalent in U.S.,” “found that bullying in U.S. workplaces is alive and well. And, in many cases, managers and supervisors are the bullies: Nearly 45 percent of the respondents reported that they have worked for an abusive boss.”

In a September 25, 2000 article by Sarah A. Klein in Crain’s Chicago Business, “Take that you big, bad corporate bully! More firms seek ways to tame uncivil bosses, workers,” reported that “in one national survey, 53% of workers who reported themselves the target of incivility said they lost time worrying about incidents at work, from receiving a nasty or demeaning note to enduring a supervisor’s temper tantrum. Almost half of the group in the University of North Carolina’s ‘Workplace Incivility Study’ said they contemplated changing jobs to avoid the offender, and 12% actually followed through.”
An earlier recognition of problems associated with dysfunctional managers was addressed in a November 1, 1991 American Management Association article “Coping with Dysfunctional Managers,” in “Supervisory Management.” That article early in the last decade began to recognize the dysfunctional managers as “adults who grew up in dysfunctional families” and learned special coping skills, not as those adults who became dysfunctional based upon their later life experiences. Yet that summary, citing an article by Francine S. Hall in the Summer 1991 issue of “Organizational Dynamics,” has some applicability today in its observation that, “frequently, says Hall, the organizational culture unwillingly contributes to a dysfunctional manager’s destructive behavior. If control, for instance, is valued within the company, the dysfunctional manger might fit all too well into the framework.”

In a June 10, 2008 op-ed piece for “Business Wire” by Stephen Xavier, CEO of Cornerstone Executive Development Group, “Micro-Managing CEOs Are a Danger Sign in This Economy,” Xavier observed “there are also micro-managers who will jump from one large company to another. Given his record at Home Depot, one would have thought that Bob Nardelli would have had trouble getting hired as CEO of any major corporation. Yet, this old-school authoritarian CEO has found a home as CEO at Chrysler which unsurprisingly has the same history of poor labor relations, shoddy products and eroding market share.”
In The Dumbest Moments in Business History: Useless Products, Ruinous Deals, Clueless Bosses and other Signs of Unintelligent Life in the Workplace, Adam Horowitz, editor, Portfolio, the Penguin Group, New York, 2004, relates the January 2003, statement of Goldman Sachs Group CEO Henry Paulson concerning the investment banking firm’s employee layoffs for which he apologized to employees by voicemail a week later. “I don’t want to sound heartless, but in almost every one of our businesses, there are 15 to 20 percent of the people that really add 80 percent of the value. Although we have a lot of good people, you can cut a fair amount and still be well positioned for the upturn.” (p.21)
Richard Farson in Management of the Absurd: Paradoxes in Leadership, Simon & Shuster, Inc., New York, 1996, wrote “many of us have the idea that as managers we can use our skills to shape our employees as if we were shaping clay, molding them into what we want them to become. But that isn’t the way it really works. It’s more as if our employees are piles of clay into which we fall—leaving an impression, all right, and that impression is distinctly us, but it may not be the impression we intended to leave.” (p. 41)

Although there has been a wealth of academic research on dysfunctional workplaces and the people who manage them, there has been a noticeable absence of material in the popular literature on the subject of dysfunctional managers. Some popular management books have addressed the “boss from hell,” such as Managing Your Boss, by Sandi Mann, Barron’s, 2001. In the section on “dealing with the boss from hell,” Sandi Mann characterizes bosses as bullies if they are continually abusive and arrogant, exploding angrily, constantly criticizing, belittling, ridiculing employees. Mann suggests that while such bosses, similar to impatient or stressed bosses, achieve their desired results, there are serious consequences to employees due to chronic workplace bullying including serious health problems for employees and lost time to the business.
A few books, such as When Smart People Work for Dumb Bosses, by William and Kathleen Lundin, McGraw-Hill, 1998, and Crazy Bosses, by Stanley Bing, HarperCollins Publishers, 2007, address the demoralizing short-sighted management decisions, thoughtless actions and rude behaviors of managers and the obnoxious and dangerous insanity of managers, respectively. The Lundins wrote, “Dysfunction can be the outcome of dumb (inept, misguided, insensitive, power-driven, unfeeling) leadership or dumb (tradition-bound, blind-sided, arrogant) organizational thinking.” (p. 117) They further wrote, “we predict more and more of what this paradigm example shows as organizations, out of competitive anxiety, dash toward ‘technological fixes’ without considering how the people who have to adapt to those ‘fixes’ need to be helped to do so.” (p. 117) Stanley Bing writes “bully management is perhaps the most difficult of all tasks for those who wish to survive in a world filled with the impressive variety of sick senior officers.” (Crazy Bosses, p. 75) He noted the inconsistent nature of the bully manager with “vast emotional swings depending on mood, often seemingly unrelated to external circumstances,” (p. 75) further noting that “management by terror has been a time-honored technique because it works.” (p. 76)

The Paradox Businesses Face with the Dysfunctional Manager


Many organizations adopted a family style culture during the latter part of the 20th Century. However, some quickly became dysfunctional family styled organizations, focused on a few functional details that yielded to the short-term success of the organization and its leaders rather than the engagement and empowerment of employees or associates. Communication, sensitivity and caring, which are at the heart of a fully functioning and competitive organization are hazy or lost in dysfunctional management styles. After relating many interviews with a variety of employees the Lundins observed “the most compelling observation is how people in power—from those who manage a small department to leaders of multinational corporations—believe they have the right to manipulate and play with the emotions of their employees.” (p. 173)
An example of the bully as a dysfunctional manager is one who appears in a temper at the employee’s office questioning the status of activity or demanding a status report when it was previously provided, but the manager did not take them time to save it or look for it. Or in the mean spirit of another example, demeaning an employee with years of published and very successful writing experience with the statement “you sometimes write as though English is your second language.”

The Dilbert cartoon strip by Scott Adams has popularly and perhaps now properly characterized the dysfunctional bullying boss. In The Dilbert Principle: A Cubicle’s-Eye View of Bosses, Meetings, Management Fads & Other Workplace Afflictions, HarperBusiness, HarperCollins Publishers, New York, 1996, Adams described the change in the management selection process from the Peter Principle of workers being promoted to bosses beyond their levels of competence to the Dilbert Principle of the most ineffective workers being “systematically moved to the place where they can do the least damage: management.” (p. 14)

In The Dilbert Principle Scott Adams shares an email submission that is similar to the statement of the Goldman Sachs Group CEO previously identified in The Dumbest Moments in Business History.
“A newly appointed VP of my company, in an interview printed in the internal company news rag, made the following comment when asked whether existing employees would be relocated if the company won an upcoming contract, or if the company would instead hire local people: ‘Engineers are basically a commodity. It doesn’t make economic sense for the company to pay for moves when we can buy the same commodity on site.’

Naturally, this disturbed some individuals in the workforce and a number of them showed up at an all-hands meeting held by this VP a few days later and sat in the front row plastered with signs labeling themselves as ‘Bananas,’ ‘Pork Bellies,’ etc.” (pp. 295, 296)

Yet, these dysfunctional managers are frequently successful, in a financial sense both as individuals and for their organizations. In the Human Resource Management article describing the 2007 study by Employment Law Alliance, its CEO Stephen J. Hirschfeld was quoted, that “changing the behavior of workplace bullies could be problematic for employers, Hirschfeld concedes, because workplace bullies can be high performers. Aggressive or ‘type A’ behaviors tend to be rewarded in the workplace, but Hirschfeld contends that employers need to draw the line and make sure aggressive workers don’t become abusive managers.” A Wall Street Journal article viewing the recruitment of chief executive officers observed that the characteristics of recent CEO hires have been focused on specific financial talents, details and successes rather than on the broader team leader or coach models of the past.

A September 1, 1996 article on “Making it, CEO style,” in “Executive Female by D. A. Benton stated that among five personality traits of chief executive officers ”“the higher you go, the more exposure to the big picture you have, the more you might think being detail-oriented is unnecessary. Wrong. It’s just the opposite. According to near-perfect chiefs, the higher you go, the more critical it is to be aware of details.”

In Management, a Revised Edition by Peter F. Drucker with Joseph A. Maciariello, HarperCollins Publishers, 1973, 1974, in the introduction to management and managers, Drucker observes “there is tremendous stress these days on liking people, helping people, getting along with people, as qualifications for a manager. These alone are never enough. In every successful organization there are bosses who do not like people, who do not help them, and who do not get along with them. Cold, unpleasant, demanding, they often teach and develop more people than anyone else. They command more respect that the most likable person ever could. They demand exacting workmanship of themselves and other people. They set high standards and expect that they will be lived up to. They consider only what is right and never who is right. And though often themselves persons of brilliance, they never rate intellectual brilliance above integrity in others. The manger who lacks these qualities of character—no matter how likable, helpful, or amiable, no matter, even, how competent or brilliant--is a menace who is unfit to be a manager.” (p. 10) Drucker concludes, “Organizations are far from perfect. As every manger knows, they are very difficult; full of frustration, tension, and friction; clumsy and unwieldy. But they are the only tools we have to accomplish such social purposes as economic production and distribution, health care, governance, and education. And there is not the slightest reason to expect society to be willing to do without these services that only performing organizations can provide.

Indeed, there is every reason to expect society to demand more performance from all its institutions, and to become more dependent upon their performance. And it is the managers who make institutions perform.” (p. 526)

Reforming or Reassigning the Dysfunctional Manager

Returning to the American Management Association’s article, “Coping with Dysfunctional Managers,” cited earlier in this article, efforts a decade and a half ago to solve problems related to the behaviors of dysfunctional managers were in their infancy. That article stated that in solving the problem, “often supervisors of dysfunctional managers mistake behavior problems for management skills problems. But for the true dysfunctional manager, attending seminars on improving management will have only short-term success. Once a manager has accepted the fact that he or she is dysfunctional, Hall advises, a recovery program should be sought. As for organizations, how companies both recognize the problem and effect solutions will be one of the most difficult challenges for managements in the next decade.”

One method to identify the dysfunctional manager to senior management is to allow the manager to demonstrate dysfunctional incompetence in the forum it most frequently appears. For example, if it occurs in meetings find an appropriate opportunity to invite the dysfunctional manager’s supervisor to a meeting or if it occurs in written or verbal communications seek witnesses. This may, however, be a long-term effort that may not have a desirable short-term result. Another approach may be to identify documented problems seeking solutions from appropriate sources. Still another approach may be to a peer or three level review.

Rather than providing seminars and additional training for dysfunctional managers, the solution may include intensive efforts to identify dysfunctional managers and provide coaching or reassignment when those follow-ups are needed. One-on-one coaching, engaging a mentor relationship or even peer networking groups with other managers focused on identifying issues adversely impacting the dysfunctional manager’s style may lead to behavior modification techniques.

If the Problem is Not Addressed: Potential for Legislation

Some articles, such as the 2007 Human Resource Management summary of the Employment Law Alliance study on bullying in the workplace, suggest that a growing awareness of the problem could result in the potential for legislation if employers fail to remedy the situation. That article reported, “There are proposals in about a dozen states for some form of workplace bullying legislation.” It also referenced “a recent anti-bullying law enacted in the Canadian province of Quebec that gives workers the right to file suit against their employers and to recover damages for ‘any vexatious behavior that affects an employee’s dignity or their psychological or physical integrity.”

Conclusion

The inevitable general conclusion, however, is that the cycle of the dysfunctional non-abusive manager may not be the right type of manager for the current competitive broadcasti environment, facing cost-cutting efficiency, financial challenges and economic declines domestically and internationally.

For Bexley Public Radio, the conclusion is that executives must challenge their managers to make workplace adjustments that recognize the incredible achievements of their staff in building a radio station for Bexley and the surrounding communities. From nothing, staff has created a community service that is unique in the central Ohio area.

Managers must create tangible rewards for their staff who have given life to the FCC’s mandate of local programming. Managers must reward production staff and performers like Joe Contino, Dave Eaton, Lee Edmondson, Laura Franks, Zach Fries, Mel Greenball, Amy Maurer, Terry Pugh and Katy Taylor.

Since the dysfunctional managers at Bexley Public Radio may have difficulty self-identifying their need to transition their management style, executives must be prepared to assist managers in that transition through coaching and mentor or peer networking opportunities. If the dysfunctional manager cannot adapt hardened characteristics to the amiable and servant leader model of management, reassignment or termination may be the course that this broadcast organization must consider.

For Bexley Public Radio, there is hope, however, that in the foreseeable future effective managers with the hardened characteristics of the qualified manager that Drucker proposed, and who remain for the longer term, can adapt those characteristics to the amiable and servant leader model. That combined model appears to have staying power that will bring longer-term success to the organization and the relationship with its volunteers or associates.

AAR


Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. The styles "The Most Sensitive Man in Bexley" and "MSMIB" are the property of Bexley Public Radio Foundation.

MSMIB commentary. Street safety.

Carriages in the Streets? No. Carnage in the Streets!

By the most sensitive man in Bexley, Simon Doer

I realize that I should have written this article in the spring, summer or fall, however, since several resident drivers have recently voiced concerns about the issue, there is no time like the present to address their concerns.

As I ruminated about the issue, winter is a fine time to address the issue as we again anticipate spring.



At issue is the frequency of pedestrians in the streets of Bexley. This does not appear to be an aberration. Joggers, walkers, skateboarders, inline skaters and yes, pedestrians pushing strollers and carriages in the streets. One can understand joggers, skateboarders and even inline skaters on the streets of Bexley as sidewalks are not always as level as the roadways. Those individuals accept the risk of their actions. Some of us may have even experienced the sidewalk jogger running across an intersection without them stopping as they assume the right of way.

But babies in carriages or strollers don’t have that choice (No, this is not a commentary on the issue of abortion)..

Having been amazed more than once by walkers and baby pushers assuming a full lane of travel on the roadway, I am reminded of the game of chicken on the east coast. Sadly the driver is the loser no matter what happens.

One driver mentioned that when a biker AT NIGHT and without lights turned in front of the vehicle the biker’s comment in reply to the driver’s question through an open window a to whether the biker was attempting to kill herself, the sarcastic reply was “Yes!”



Yes Bexley has a city ordinance 416.05 “Walking Along Highways.” It is written: “(a) Where a sidewalk is provided and its use is practicable, no pedestrian shall walk along and upon an adjacent roadway.” A catchall provision in ordinance 416.05 (d) provides that in any event pedestrians “shall yield the right of way to all vehicles upon the roadway.” And yes Bexley has an ordinance 416.07 requiring that vehicles yield to pedestrians on sidewalks (fair is fair).

Even bikers, who should have equal access to the streets not only in a green policy environment but as a matter of everyday courtesy, need to be a bit more aware of the street wise environment.



Just last evening at approximately 9 p.m. a biker dressed in gray clothing on a very dark night was riding approaching traffic on Parkview Drive in the right lane without a light (allegedly in violation of Bexley city ordinance 474.05). Fortunately my lights illuminated her and her bike so that I could move left to allow our opposing vehicles to pass without incident.

So, let’s all show a little more courtesy out there, drivers, riders, walkers, skateboarders, rollerbladers, walkers with strollers.

Put yourself in each others’ shoes or on each others wheels.

The life you save may not only be your own but those who love and are loved around you. What a tragedy otherwise.

That is this sensitive man’s opinion, what is yours?

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. The styles "The Most Sensitive Man in Bexley" and "MSMIB" are the property of Bexley Public Radio Foundation.

Monday, December 22, 2008

Pianist Loren Fishman performs at Bexley public library auditorium.


Pianist Loren Fishman is a regular performer at the Bexley Public Library Auditorium and his Sunday afternoon (December 21) performance was a rewarding event.

Fishman is a 2003 graduate of Bexley High School who is now a student of Lydia Artymiw at the University of Minnesota Graduate School. Fishman is studying at Minnesota under a Berneking fellowship award.

The Bexley recital was well-attended for a cold windy Sunday afternoon in December. Sixty-five people attended and were warmed by hot tea and cookies before the performance began. The audience was typical for a Bexley musical performance. Some seniors, some middle aged, some in their twenties. The holiday visits of adult children and college students returning home accounted for most of the age groupings in attendance.

The audience was dressed for the outdoor weather. Ski coats. Wool overcoats. Gloves, caps and scarves. Colors were dark for the most part. Two members of the audience wore berets. One red, the other black. Only one man wore a tie, and that was a bow tie. Dapper.

Fishman wore a white, perhaps cream colored, blouse, loose at the waist and with a 60s Nehru collar. The fabric might have been pleated or with a stripe in the fabric.

The stage lighting in this auditorium is always inadequate and consequently it was difficult to see Fishman’s face and hands during the performance.

For listeners who have followed Fishman’s performances from year to year, Sunday’s pieces offered some familiar works and some new additions to his repertoire.

The Mozart and Rachmaninoff selections were familiar and both were performed with a maturing discipline. (W.A. Mozart (1756-1791) Sonata in C major, K 330, Allegro-moderato, Andante cantabile and Allegreto; followed by Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943), Etude-tableaux in C minor, Op. 39, no. 1, Prelude in B minor, Op. 32, no. 10, Prelude in G sharp minor, Op. 32, no. 12, Prelude in B flat major, Op. 23, no. 2.).

The pauses between the three movements in the Mozart selection were brief, almost split seconds. Much too short for my ear. Was Fishman eager to conclude this Mozart piece that he has performed so often? That can’t be the explanation. The Allegro was aggressive but not hasty in its tempo. Except for the final cord, the Andante cantabile was reflective and well-paced, with a restraint that confirmed that Fishman was performing intentionally.

The Rachmaninoff piece was suitable for the weather but needed a tormented audience to fully appreciate its movements. As usual, a Bexley audience is much too restrained. Vodka and pirogi, not herbal tea and cookies, should have been served at this recital. Fishman’s calm and detached playing of the B minor prelude offered a solace reminiscent of ice cold vodka under a full moon.

The selections that followed intermission were examples of the best of Romantic music and also the most plebian. Chopin’s Scherzo that concluded the recital gave the audience a measure to compare the Gottschalk and Ponce compositions.

The Manuel M. Ponce (1882-1948) Intermezzo in E minor and Gavota in D flat major were enjoyable pieces but sounded like background music from Hollywood movies in the 1930s and 1940s.

In the program. the Gottschalk pieces are curious selections. These pieces were composed by Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829-1869) Ricordati: Yearning romance, Op. 26, Valse poetique: The sigh, Op. 24 and Pasquinade: Caprice, Op. 59.

Gottschalk was a 19th century American composer and popular piano performer. My suspicion is that he performed in minstrel shows and early vaudeville. If he didn’t he should have.

Fishman who is usually reticent about his selections, took a moment to inform his audience that Gottschalk’s Ricordati: Yearning romance, Op. 26 has an inscription on the cover of the sheet music. For the inscription, Gottschalk (or perhaps some music publisher) selected a line from Dante’s Inferno to the effect that it is a pain to remember happy times when you are in misery.

Although Gottschalk is usually identified as an American Romantic composer, his work is largely sentimental without the intelligence of even the likes of Stephen Foster.

The best that can be said of Gottschalk is that some of his measures anticipate American Hip Hop rhythms.

What seems to have saved Gottschalk’s name from well-deserved oblivion is the general acceptance that Romantic music doesn’t need to make sense. Thus, the three Gottschalk pieces presented by Fishman are exercises well-performed that suffer from weak compositions, and even worse, compositions that bear no relationship whatsoever to their titles.

Ricordati? What does Ricordati even mean? The music that follows is certainly neither yearning nor romantic. The Valse poetique was closer to a snore than a sigh and it seemed to me that it was written in four-four time rather than the expected three-four of a waltz. Too much already said about Gottschalk, a name that deserves oblivion.

The final piece reminded all of us what excellence is in music, both composition and performance. Frederic Chopin (1829-1869) Scherzo no. 2 in B flat minor, Op. 31.

Fishman gave his audience a gift with the Chopin piece.

One pleasure of living in Bexley is the culture available in the neighborhood. Having musicians like Loren Fishman perform here is something that makes this community a special place to live. Thank you Loren.

KHW

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Empire & Western Deposit Agency.

Saturday, December 20, 2008

MacKenzie Owens wins cake decoration contest. Dianne Garrett reports.

MacKenzie Owens with her gingerbread castle fashioned after "Candy Land".

MacKenzie Owens may only be a pint size seven year old, but she has a big creative spirit to go along with her holiday spirit. The Whitehall youth participated in this year's "Gingerbread House Competition" sponsored by Franklin Park Conservatory. Children up to 12 years old had to make a house from their favorite book, movie or game. MacKenzie chose "Candy Land", and built a beautiful castle of ice cream cones, gum drops, graham crackers and other yummy confections.

Other categories included family, adult and professional. Family had to do a replica of their home, adults had to do a garden structure, and professionals were nature inspired. There were over 40 entries, only one was professional, and that one received a small cash prize. All others were awarded a one year membership for their entire households to the conservatory for one year.

The sweet creations were judged on over all appearance, originality/creativity, difficulty, precision and consistency of theme. The outside of the structures had to be edible, and children were to do all the work themselves. MacKenzie and her mom spent a lot of time searching the for materials at the grocery store.

Some other designs included an igloo, tree trunk with a scene inside, log cabins and gardens.

MacKenzie is the daughter of Bayden Eastman and Dale Owens, and the granddaughter of Barb Penn and great-granddaughter of June Bare, who was ill and unable to be present for a photo. Congratulations, MacKenzie, on a job well done, and thanks for sharing it with WCRX.

Holidays at the Conservatory runs through January 4, 2009. Please see more information on this blog about Franklin Park Conservatory.

Seven year old MacKenzie Owens created this gingerbread castle, and won a year's membership to Franklin Park Conservatory for her entire household. Pictured left to right are her mother, Bayden Eastman, five year old brother, Mason Owens, and grandmother, Barb Penn. Great-grandmother, June Bare, also of Whitehall, was unable to be present.


Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Dianne Garrett.

WCCA pancake breakfast with Santa Claus. Dianne Garrett reports.



Whitehall Council President Brent Howard (left) looks forward to flipping pancakes each year for Santa and breakfast attendees. WCCA member, Dana Jones, was a little more hesitant about sending a flapjack into the air.




Whitehall City Councilwoman Leslie LaCorte shares a pancake moment with five year old granddaughter, Abella Bishop, at the WCCA breakfast with Santa event.



This little baby seemed quite content on December 13, and oblivious to all the pratter. Santa came to Whitehall Community Park to the delight of area children. Whitehall Community Celebration Association sponsored the annual breakfast with Santa event to benefit Community Kids Christmas, which provides Christmas to needy children and their families. Admission was one dollar or a canned food item for a chance to visit with the jolly elf and enjoy all the pancakes and sausage they could eat.

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Dianne Garrett.

Outdoor Christmas decorations. Dianne Garrett reports.

Members of the Whitehall Community Celebration Association (WCCA) cruised the city looking for decorated houses for this year's annual competition. Three were chosen from each ward, and photos displayed at the December 13 Breakfast with Santa. Attendees cast ballots to vote on their favorites, but only one was the over all winner. Each first place winner will receive a plaque, and all others a certificate. They ranked as follows:

Ward 1
First 198 N. Yearling Road
Second 156 Parklawn Blvd.
Third 133 Rita Court

Ward 2
First 3818 Brentwood Court
Second 4088 Mayflower Blvd.
Third 4250 Mayflower Blvd.

Ward 3
First 4539 St. Ann Lane
Second 1000 Westphal Avenue
Third 4575 St. Anthony Lane

Ward 4
First 943 Duke Road
Second 4720 Harbinger Court E.
Third 4993 Vanderbilt Drive

And the 2008 over all winner is..............................

133 Rita Court, owned by Donald Hess. The resident will be awarded a plaque and certificate.





Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Dianne Garrett.

2008 Christmas card. Matuszak and Garrett.


John Matuszak and Dianne Garrett, of "Eastside News Round-Up" wish you a very Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

Have a news item or interesting person you'd like us to know about? We want to know!!!!

For Bexley and East Columbus: Contact John at baffling24@aol.com

For Whitehall and East Columbus: Contact Dianne at Diannegarrett3@aol.com

Listen every Wednesday 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. for all the latest news and happenings on the east side.

Dianne's Recipe Page. Chocolate Caramel Cake.

Chocolate Caramel Cake

1 dark chocolate cake mix
1 jar caramel ice cream topping
1 (14 oz.) can sweetened condensed milk
1 (8 oz.) carton whipped topping, thawed

Bake cake according to package directions in 9"x13"x2" pan. While cake is still warm, poke holes in cake with handle of a wooden spoon. Pour caramel topping over warm cake. Then pour condensed milk over cake. Cool completely, and frost with thawed topping.

Makes a great ooey, gooey, moist dessert.

December events at Franklin Park Conservatory. Dianne Garrett reports.

Holidays at the Conservatory will continue through January 4, 2009.

Other upcoming December events:
December 26 - Interactive Japanese Taiko drumming demonstration
December 27 - Interactive performance: joyUNSPEAKABLE
December 28 - High Jinks Dance Company perform at the Palm House
December 29 - Ice carving from Rock On Ice
December 30 - Make a Holiday Craft

Franklin Park Conservatory is located at 1777 East Broad Street.
Phone Number: 614-848-4700
Log on to: www.fpconservatory.org
Hours: Tuesday - Sunday 10-5 and Wednesday 10-8

Many exciting displays and classes are planned for 2009.

Botanical Drawing: Graphite Pencil
Students in this class will learn to observe with an artist's perspective, and how to create botanical drawings using graphite pencil. This class is suitable for the beginner or for the returning student looking to hone their skills. February 19 and 26 & March 5; 1-3 p.m.
Cost is $45 for members and $50 for non-members.

Botanical Drawing: Colored Pencil
Express your interest in the colorful beauty of the Conservatory using colored pencils as a medium. Techniques covered include color mixing, layering, building and burnishing in color. March 12, 19, 26; 1-3 p.m. Cost is $45 for members and $50 for non-members.

The Orchid Forest, January 11 - March 1
The Conservatory becomes a winter haven with a vibrant display of hundreds of tropical orchids from around the world.

Blooms and Butterflies, March 14 - September 7
Experience the emergence of exotic butterflies and watch their release into the Conservatory's Pacific Water Garden. Dozens of species take flight amidst tropical blooming foliage.

Chihuly: Re-imagined: Fall 2009 through Spring 2010
The Conservatory's collection of Dale Chihuly artworks, acquired in 2004, will be re-installed in new configurations along with favorites from the Conservatory's 2003-04 exhibition, "Chihuly at the Conservatory". The nearly 2,500 individual pieces of glass that make up this signature collection will be placed within the plant collections and throughout the indoor and outdoor spaces along with some new installations from Chihuly Studios.

Cocktails at the Conservatory
Thursdays 5:30 p.m. - 10 p.m.
Enjoy featured cocktails, a full bar, hors d'oeuvres by Cameron Mitchell Catering, and music by Encore Entertainment in the tropical surroundings of the John F. Wolfe Palm House. During the warmer months, this event moves to the rooftop gardens. Parking is free and there is no cover charge.

Permanent Exhibition
"Light Raiment", a light installation by James Turrell, illuminates the Palm House every evening from just after dusk until just before dawn. Using 7,000 low-voltage light-emitting (LED) bulbs, highlights the beauty and significance of the 1895 Victorian glass house, and is intended as a piece of public art for the community to enjoy.

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Dianne Garrett.

Saturday, December 13, 2008

Parsnips. Arbitron and Meta-Arbitron.

For Arbitron the question is “How many WCRX-LP listeners are out there?”

In the November reporting period, WCRX-LP did not reach the minimum ten entries in Arbitron listener journals.

Despite this, Bexley Public Radio has listeners.

For listeners, the question is “How useful is the information that Bexley Public Radio provides?”

We offer the following anecdote as a Meta-Arbitron listener report.

On her Thursday December 11 Noontime Gardener program, Amy Maurer discussed parsnips and described it as a vegetable that can be grown during late autumn, early winter and in the early spring.

Amy also said that Bexley Natural Foods is currently offering parsnips in the fresh produce department.

On the following Saturday, Amy went to Bexley Natural Foods for some weekend shopping. A neighbor was also shopping and told Amy that she had heard Amy’s radio discussion and was at the store to buy some parsnips.

The important message in this Meta-Arbitron listener report is that accurate information was provided to a listener.

The information was heard.

The information prompted consumer action.

Bexley commerce increased.

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation.

Feng Shui and the art of listening to Bexley Public Radio

Car radios receive the WCRX-LP signal everywhere within the I-270 circle of concrete that surrounds metropolitan Columbus.

Inside houses and buildings, listeners complain about reception problems. And even no reception at all.

The usual advice for solving these problems is to buy a better radio.

Other solutions that listeners have used include adjusting the lay of the AC power cord attached to the radio. If the radio has an extension antenna, adjusting the antenna and the body of the radio also provide possible solutions.

In addition to these solutions, Lee Edmondson offers a unique approach to reception problems she experienced in her Bexley residence.

Lee’s solution is to apply principles of feng shui to connecting to Bexley Public Radio.

Lee lives near Alum Creek in Bexley and had difficulty receiving the WCRX-LP signal in her residence.

Lee is familiar with feng shui principles and decided to apply them in positioning her radio for receiving Bexley Public Radio.

She began by unplugging her radio and setting it near the center of her residence.

She then relaxed in the approximate center of her first floor and near the radio.

After achieving a calmness and becoming aware of her surroundings she concentrated on her purpose in applying feng shui.

This seemingly simple task turned out to be the most difficult part of the Lee’s exercise.

Her purpose was more than receiving an electronic signal from a distant transmitter and antenna.

As Lee relaxed and focused her mind, the list of purposes grew. Hearing the voices of friends, hearing information on local events in her neighborhood. Listening to lunch specials at Bexley lunch spots. Arranging her tasks according to cultural events scheduled near her residence. Distraction from vexatious problems. Relaxation. All these purposes came to her mind.

During this initial process, the complexity of Lee’s purposes began to resolve itself into Lee’s recognition of Ch’i.

She continued this exercise by making a mental inventory of the objects in her residence. She observed them in relationship to the geometric planes of her rooms and hallways.

She also noted the moveable objects in her yard. And, the living fixed objects, trees, shrubs and grasses were also noted.

Her awareness of stationary objects, the buildings, sidewalks, driveways and curbs, were tinctured with an understanding of their ages, purposes and condition.

Lee concentrated on each of these objects, those inside and outside. She made mental notes as to how the objects helped her achieve purposes that were connected to why she wanted to receive the Bexley Public Radio signal.

This exercise resulted in Lee identifying several objects in her house that were no longer needed and she gave them away. In particular, she understood that a table was a major impediment to receiving the Bexley Public Radio signal. She gave the table away. A simple, very ordinary charitable gesture.

Lee then moved to each of the major entrances to her first floor. At each of the doors and windows, she relaxed and concentrated on her purposes.

She also moved her location and concentration to the major openings on her second floor.

From this exercise she identified locations that were conducive to her purpose. And Lee experimented, plugging the radio into locations that were compatible with her identification of Ch’i. Her north wall parallels East Main Street was important in its relationship to Ch'i. The microwave, whether working or not, was a major impediment. A ficus tree was very compatible with Ch'i. Her plug-in clean scent was compatible with Ch'i and the aroma was helpful in Lea's mental efforts.

Outside, Lee made a concentrated effort to identify the contours of the land in her neighborhood. She also developed an awareness of the dominance of nearby Alum Creek in relation to Ch’i.

Lee began this process in late summer after the Summer Equinox and will continue the process until the Winter Solstice, making adjustments to the location of objects inside and outside her residence.

This exercise of feng shui has been successful and Lee receives Bexley Public Radio on her home radio.

The reception is still imperfect but it is real and helps Lee achieve her purposes in listening to Bexley Public Radio.

Relaxation.

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation.

Wednesday, December 10, 2008

Amy Maurer. Noontime Gardener. The edible plants of Bexley. Ziziphus or Jujube fruit.



Each year, Amy Maurer, the noontime gardener on Bexley Public Radio offers a weekly report on the development of an edible plant growing in Bexley.

This year, Amy followed the growth and development of the Ziziphus fruit. The Zizphus tree featured in Amy's report grows on Maryland Avenue Ave. in North Bexley.

Amy gathered and selected the ripe fruit during late November. Egle Weiland prepared and served the Ziziphus as part of a dried fruit stuffing in pork tenderloin for an entree. Egle also prepared the Ziziphus as a dessert for after the meal.

The dessert recipe is as follows:

Ziziphus Dessert Recipe:

This is a dessert made from Bexley grown Ziziphus fruit. The fruit is also called the Jujube fruit or the Chinese fig.

For about a cup or two of fruit dessert:

Cut open about two cups of Ziziphus fruit and remove the seed.

Juice of one lemon

Three Tbsp of brown sugar

Handful of raisins

Red wine, enough to soak fruit

Bake at 350 degrees until fruit is soft

Additional ingredients that can be added or substituted include dried or fresh fruit or nuts.

Can be served with ice cream, cheesecake, or served plain with whipped cream.

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Empire and Western Deposit Agency.

Thursday, December 4, 2008

Dianne Garrett reports on Whitehall Christmas tree lighting.


Naja and Carol Bailey bundled up and enjoyed the lighting ceremony. They are the wife and mother of Councilman Bob Bailey. The Baileys also have a daughter in the WYHS band.

It is officially the Christmas season in Whitehall. Mayor John Wolfe, with the help of Kaylee Maggard, Miss Whitehall, and Selena Welch, Little Miss Whitehall, the switch was thrown illuminating decorations in front of city hall and the police department on Yearling Road.



Christmas carols reverberated thanks to the Whitehall Yearling High School band. Whitehall Community Celebration Association provided refreshments for attendees.




Mayor Wolfe made it very clear that he wishes everyone a Merry Christmas, as opposed to a happy holiday. He is also proud to display the Nativity in front of city hall.

Dianne Gararett's community calendar. Eastpointe live Nativity.

Eastpointe Christian Church will present "Journey To Bethlehem", an interactive outdoor program December 12 and 13. Visitors will be able to step back in time, as they travel beneath the stars to enjoy the animals, shepherds, angels, a first century market place and the Nativity 6-9 p.m.

Admission is free. The church is located at 745 N. Waggoner Road in Blacklick. For more information, call 614-501-8594 or visit www.eastpointe.cc.

Dianne Garrett's community calendar. Pancake breakfast supports Toys for Tots.

A pancake breakfast to benefit Toys for Tots will be Saturday, December 6 at The Woodlands 9-11 a.m. Cost for the all-you-can eat breakfast is $5. The Woodlands is located at the intersection of E. Broad Street and Cardinal.

Dianne Garrett's community calendar. Open Shelter needs winter clothing and blankets.

OPEN SHELTER, located at 61 East Broad Street, is in dire need of blankets, coats, gloves, hats, and all types of winter apparel. They will accept new or gently used.

Dianne Garrett's community calendar. Student writing contest.

2008 Students For Change Essay Writing Contest. High school seniors and college students are eligible. NLS Publishing will be awarding three $1,000 scholarships to the winners. Students must submit a 1,000 - 2,000 word essay describing, "What the election of Barack Obama, the first African-American president, means to you and your family". Essays are due January 20. Log on to: www.2008studentsforchange.com.

Dianne's Recipe Page. Chocolate Cheese Fudge

The following recipe is a GREAT fudge that I've made for many years, and is always a hit. You will enjoy the rich, creamy confection. Awesome as a gift, too!

Chocolate Cheese Fudge

1/2 lb. Velveeta Cheese, chunked
2 sticks of butter
1 tsp. vanilla extract (I prefer double strength)
1 cup chopped pecans (optional)
2 16 oz. packages of powdered sugar
1/2 cup cocoa powder

Lightly spray a 9x9 inch or 8x8 inch square pan with non-stick cooking spray.

In a sauce pan over medium heat, melt cheese and butter together, stirring constantly until smooth.

In a large bowl sift sugar and cocoa together. Then combine the wet with the dry ingredients, stirring until well mixed. Batter will be stiff.

Remove from bowl to pan, pressing firmly and evenly. Pat the top of the candy for excess oil from the butter. Refrigerate until firm. Cut into squares.

You will not taste the cheese. It only serves to give the candy a wonderful consistency and very rich flavor.

Dianne Garrett commentary.

I love a bargain as much as the next person. But I've yet to turn shopping into one of my favorite hobbies, sports or social activities. I shop when there is something I truly need or want, AND when I can afford it. I do enjoy shopping when traveling, because there are always interesting things to see when visiting other areas. However, that does not mean I actually make purchases. The looking is fun, too.

I don't really enjoy "the hunt" either. That brings me to "Black Friday". I'd rather run bamboo shoots under my fingernails than fight crowds of shoppers. This year I was in Florida, and went for a short hop with my brother-in-law, Mike, and husband, Jack, on a mission. Mike wanted to buy two big flat screen TV's to surprise his wife and son, while they were on sale, as early Christmas presents.

You see, Mike had a brain aneurysm that ruptured on May 28 this year. We almost lost him. It was a long summer of recuperation. Mike was finally able to go back to work on November 10 after almost losing his life. We didn't know for a couple of weeks if he would survive. He was so appreciative of all his wife and son endured, and all the love and help they offered to nurse him back to life, that he was determined we would find the perfect TV's. And we did.

While we were out, I found a new book by my favorite author, and my husband had me pick out my birthday present so that would be out of the way. He hates to shop, too. We did all this in about an hour. We waited until early afternoon, so that the crowds would be thinned out.

Later that night we saw on the news, just like everyone else, about the Wal-Mart seasonal employee who was trampled to death when he opened the doors for business. Another was injured at a different location. Unbelievable! What kind of mentality does a holiday shopper have to possess to even want to stampede into a store like a bunch of horses let out of the shoot? Has getting a bargain turned them into animals?

What kind of people knock someone down like that? Even worse, what kind of people continue to tromp over a person, and keep going just to purchase presents for their own loved ones? How about the loved ones of the deceased? I wonder if any of those shoppers are thinking about that.

I have friends and family who will go to those early morning sales just to go through the doors when they open. Many of them think they have to buy hordes of presents to justify a happy holiday.

I like to think it's different with me. I celebrate what Christmas means to me...the birth of my savior. I take the time to choose the right gift, leisurely. If I have to spend a few dollars more, that's okay. They will know I took the time to carefully select something just for them, instead of stampeding through a big box store looking for bargain items. And, if I can't find the perfect gift, I will give them the cash so they can shop at their leisure. It doesn't mean that I care less. It means that I am considering them, and it means that my life does not revolve around commercialism and greed.

This year, let's all learn a lesson from this tragedy. Enjoy the company of loved ones, find the blessings and joy of the meaning of the Christmas season, and take in the twinkle of your tree lights. Put on some music, sip a little cocoa or hot cider and relax. And remember that when all else fails, cash doesn't come with an interest fee or shipping charge.

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Dianne Garrett.

Friday, November 21, 2008

Dianne Garrett reports: Whitehall Community Kids Christmas.

Zach Woodruff, Whitehall Community Affairs Coordinator, visited our studio Wednesday, November 19 to share information about Community Kids Christmas. The program started ten years ago by Eastern Kiwanis and Pride of Whitehall. Each year they have raised money and collected gifts for needy children of Whitehall.

Zach explained that they tried something new this year. The fund raising began in late July in the business community, and to date they have raised over $11,000. The theme this year was "100 from 100 in 100", meaning they asked 100 businesses to give $100 within 100 days. Some gave more and some gave less, but all were excited to be on board, according to Zach. "I was pleasantly surprised with all the gloom and doom you hear about the economy. There is a passion to serve this community, even among the business owners who do not live here. The generosity is still strong. He noted that most of the businesses in the city are small.

He has worked with the social workers in the school district to identify the children and their families with needs. They then went out into the homes to learn about the kids to find out what they want, as well as what parents say they need.

Between 160-175 children will receive gifts, and the organizers hope they can serve 250 next year. "We stole a page from Jimmy Carter and Habitat for Humanity" this year. When people receive a home from Habitat, they are required to help build the home. So we asked our parents to help. By doing this, we are empowering the parents to be able to take part in the process," explained Zach.

On the second and third weeks of December 50-gallon trash bags will be dropped off, one for each child. They will be delivered while the children are at school. They will also include wrapping paper, tape and scissors to ensure the parents have the tools to do the wrapping.
He said that the parents are very excited to participate.

Santa's Christmas Coach will also make the rounds on December 20, 21 and 22 to deliver one gift that each of those children listed for their parents. Some who wanted bikes will get them delivered by the coach. Zach said, "Anyone who doesn't think the spirit of Christmas is alive and well, should come to Whitehall. The families will also receive everything they will need for Christmas dinner. Any stragglers they were unable to deliver, will be delivered on Christmas Day by Zach and his wife and others.

The businesses who have donated will receive a window cling-on to alert patrons of their participation. The establishments will be recognized by ads, as well, for residents and patrons to be aware of their generosity. Zach added that the businesses go above and beyond just paying their taxes to the city. The approximately 85 partners also include churches, civic organizations and individuals. He concluded by saying, "We want to be as responsive and generous as we can, with continued efficiency in order to expand next year.

If anyone would like to contribute, they can call Zach at 614-205-9811.

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Dianne Garrett.

Dianne's Community Calendar. Free community dinner at Christ United Methodist.

Christ United Methodist Church, 1480 Zettler Road (south of Livingston) offers a free community dinner the fourth Saturday of each month 5:30-6:30. All are welcome! For more information, call 231-4568. Listen to Bexley Public Radio on December 17 at 11 a.m. to hear representatives from the church explain more about the dinners.

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Dianne Garrett.

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

John Matuszak reports: Groundbreaking for new Bexley police headquarters



Taking part in the groundbreaking for Bexley's new police station Nov. 17 are, from left, Chief Larry
Rinehart; former chief John Carruthers; City Councilman Jeff McClelland; Police Advisory Committee Chairman Lee Nathans; Council President Matt Lampke; Council members Robyn Jones, Jed Morison, Rick Weber, Mark Masser and Ben Kessler; and Mayor John Brennan.

The station on the city's north end is expected to be completed by December, 2009, replacing the 50-year-old building on Main Street.

Cost of construction will be $7.4 million.

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text and photo are copyright 2008. All rights reserved. John Matuszak.

Thursday, November 13, 2008

Higher education and Wall Street collapse. Roundtable discussion Thursday November 13, 2008.

Bexley Public Radio sponsored a roundtable discussion of the impact of the Wall Street on higher education.


In a wide ranging discussion of Wall Street collapse college administrators and a banker discussed financial aid and student loans availability and eligibility; student applications and enrollments; faculty grants; university endowments; alumni giving; gifts of appreciated stock; and charitable gift annuities.

Participants in the round table were: Evelyn Levino, Vice President, Students, Franklin University; Will Kopp, Vice President, Institutional Advancement, Columbus State Community College; Mark Ramseth, President, Trinity Lutheran Seminary; Steve Koch, Professor, Communications, Capital University; Dave Mallet, President First Bexley Bank.

Professor Stephen Koch of Capital University communications department moderated the discussion. He began by asking about the Wall Street collapse on student enrollments.

Evelyn Levino and Will Kopp discussed admission inquiries from potential students.

Mark Ramseth, president of Trinity Lutheran Seminary said that the Trinity student body trends to be older than the other schools represented on the panel. The median age of Trinity students is in the range of 36 and 37 years. Many individuals thinking about graduate education at Trinity have families and own their residences so these potential students are less mobile that younger students and the decision to pursue graduate education is a major life changing decision.

President Mark Ramseth, Trinity Lutheran Seminary.

Banker Mallett said that the student loan market is more difficult. Fewer lenders are willing to undertake student loans. He also said that the federal government seems to be recognizing the contraction in student loans. He pointed to the recent comments of Secretary of the U.S. Treasury Paulson that recognized that consumer lending has been hampered as much as lending by financial institutions. In response to a question from Ramseth, Mallet said that regional and city center banks were restricting their lending even after federal bailout funds were received. Holding the funds as capital rather than lending the same funds helps the banks maintain favorable capital ratios for financial reporting.

Koch asked whether the panelists saw any indication that the distress of the financial markets is causing new financial planning and strategies to be developed for the expenses of higher education.

Will Kopp responded that he has recognized that students no longer approach their college educations as a continuous relationship with a single institution. He said students “swirl” their education, taking some courses at one school and then other courses at other schools and even on-line. This “swirled” course work is usually part of a coherent strategy to develop skills and knowledge useful in achieving specific career goals. The same “swirling” is used by students to achieve financial savings when they choose to take course work at particular institutions based on relative tuition charges. Kopp also noted that institutions like Capital, Columbus State and Franklin are responding to this student strategy by developing agreements and alliances that help students pursue their academic goals in a realistic financial environment.

Mark Ramseth said that students recognize that economic downturns can be occasions to improve their job skills through education. When the job market is soft, time can be spent in education.

Evelyn Levino commented that such student strategies make sense and that she would advise students “to go for it” because the end goal is education. Much can be learned from paying attention to the creative judgments that college students make. When the goal is education there can be many roads that students follow to get to that destination. Levino also commented that “self financing” should not be overlooked in the present environment. There are many students who work part-time and attend classes part-time to minimize the amount of debt incurred in their education. Will Kopp said that he is familiar with a some students who maintain fulltime employment with their class-work.

Professor Koch said that Capital University has a tuition discount program that encourages good grades. He commented that this is a form of financial aid that is unique in encouraging the core values of excellence in education.

Will Kopp commented on a Seniors to Sophomore program of the State of Ohio. The state government pays college tuition for high school students to take college courses. The program permits high school students to graduate with both a high school diploma and an associate degrees.

Professor Koch briefly discussed the financial environment on Wall Street and its impact on research grants awarded to faculty. Will Kopp commented on a recent New York Times article reporting on how college building projects are being effected by the Wall Street collapse. He also discussed Ohio Governor Ted Strickland’s commitment to education. State funds for higher education have permitted tuition levels to remain flat for two years.

Evelyn Levino said that the budgeting point of view at Franklin is to use funds to invest in the future of the institution. She continued by describing how professional organizations serving higher education are recognizing the dangers of the current financial turmoil. She said that the Student Aid Alliance recently contacted Congressional leaders to express concern that any federal economic stimulus program include student financial aid. Increases in federal Pell Grant programs were also mentioned.

Will Kopp said that many commentators were talking about ten-year plans to deal with the Wall Street collapse. He said that any governmental program of such long duration is not realistic unless it includes a component for higher education. In reference to any ten year plan.

Mark Ramseth offered the wry comment that “Markets can stay irrational longer than individuals can stay solvent.”

Steve Koch said that “A crisis cannot be the foundation of a plan.”

The discussion then turned to capital projects and bonds. Banker Mallett said that even bond markets are being effected by the fall in real estate values and the fall in equity prices. He said that currently the bond market is being dominated by financier Warren Buffett who is actively buying municipal bonds.

Koch and Mallett commented respectively on deficit spending and price levels. Mallett continued with observations on the current low interest rate levels on federal government bonds and that his family decision to “go to cash” with their children’s college savings,

Professor Koch asked whether any of the institutions represented in the roundtable was developing explicit strategies to respond to the Wall Street collapse. Will Kopp identified three components of a strategy at Columbus State Community College: recognition that the student body is diverse in age and experience; creating scholarships for students in age groups that normally are not eligible for scholarships; and creating partnerships with other educational institutions like Capital University and Franklin University that provide financial opportunities, benefits and choices for students.

Professor Koch asked if any of the panelists wanted to speculate on how long the financial crisis might last.

Evelyn Levino said that she had no empirical data to undergird her comments. Based on media reports, Levino said that she recognized radical changes in the short term and that it is her belief that we are going through a financial crisis. The practical effects of this crisis are evident in the rapid decline in housing prices and institutions and individuals “going to cash.” All of these practical effects of the crisis are not going to be fixed over night.

Will Kopp returned to the discussion of institutional strategies at Columbus State Community College. He said that students want to prepare for employment opportunities that “won’t be shipped overseas” and also in industries that provide valued products and services such as “sustainable,” and “green technologies.” An educational institution must respond to these interests and values of student populations.

Koch commented that educational opportunities are all the more important in an environment where job opportunities are “constricted.” He also discussed Capital University’s Center for Life Long Learning.

As closing observations, Mark Ramseth said that at Trinity Lutheran Seminary the economic realities that have developed are not being ignored and that “like a household” we are “re-prioritizing how we spend our resources.” He also observed that finances are central to meeting an institutions objectives and that the time and attention being devoted to the Wall Street collapse is necessary work for every institution.

Dave Mallett offered the observation that college expenses are a very significant part of family budgets. The effect of the Wall Street problems are being felt very close to home.

Evelyn Levino said that the sooner the Wall Street problems are recognized as impacting education, the sooner the country will “come out of the problem.”

Participants in the round table were: Evelyn Levino, Vice President, Students, Franklin University; Will Kopp, Vice President, Institutional Advancement, Columbus State Community College; Mark Ramseth, President, Trinity Lutheran Seminary; Steve Koch, Professor, Communications, Capital University; Dave Mallet, President First Bexley Bank.

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation.

Dianne's Cookbook. Sugar-free pumpkin treat.

A sugar-free pumpkin treat.

Pumpkin Custard

1 Jell-O sugar-free vanilla pudding snack

1/2 cup pumpkin puree (canned)

1/4 tsp. pumpkin pie spice, and/or cinnamon or nutmeg

Mix until custard is perfectly creamy and ENJOY!

Noted by Dianne Garrett for Bexley Public Radio.

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Dianne Garrett.

Dianne's Community Calendar. Whitehall Christmas tree lighting.

The City of Whitehall will kick off the Christmas season on December 2 with the annual tree lighting ceremony at city hall on Tuesday, December 2 at 6 p.m. prior to the city council meeting, which begins at 7 p.m.

DECEMBER 8-12 the Whitehall Community Celebration Association will be driving around the city 7-11 p.m. each night looking for holiday home decorations. If you want your home to be judged, leave those lights on!

December 13 Breakfast with Santa at Whitehall Community Park 9-11 a.m. Photos of the decorated homes will be on display for attendees to cast votes. Admission is $1 or one canned food item. Enjoy the all-you-can-eat pancake breakfast. Have your kids photos taken with Santa.

Listen to WCRX to find out who the winners are of the home decorating contest, and watch the blog for photos.


Noted by Dianne Garrett for Bexley Public Radio.

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Dianne Garrett.

Dianne's Community Calendar. Holiday bazaar at Eastland Career Center.

Eastland Career Center invites you to their holiday bazaar on Saturday, December 6 where you can shop from 9-3. Admission is $1, and free to children five years and younger. Each paid admission will receive one raffle ticket. Raffles will be held every hour, and you must be present to win. Extra raffle tickets can be purchased for $1 each. Concessions will be available from the Food Services program students in the cafeteria during the entire event.

Vendor spaces are available. Spaces are 6' x 6' for $25. Each additional foot is $3.50 per foot. Also, 8' tables can be rented if needed for an additional $10. General items these vendors might display are wooden products, Christmas ornaments, OSU items, jewelry, knitted goods, candles and quilts. Some "Home party" organizations that are generally represented are Tupperware, Pampered Chef, Avon and Tastefully Simple.

For additional information, call 614-836-4521.

Noted by Dianne Garrett for Bexley Public Radio.

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Dianne Garrett.

Dianne's Community Calendar. Toy sign-up.

NEIGHBORHOOD PRIDE CENTER
3685 East Livingston Avenue

Beginning November 17 - December 18 every Tuesday and Thursday 11 a.m. - 6 p.m.

FIREFIGHTERS4KIDS TOY SIGN-UPS for Columbus zip codes:
43227 43213 43068
43232 43110 43209

You will need appropriate identification for parents, guardians and children.

For more information, call 614-724-0100.

Noted by Dianne Garrett for Bexley Public Radio.

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Dianne Garrett.

Dianne's Community Calendar. CHADD meeting.

Columbus Children and Adults with Attention Deficit Hypertension Disorder (CHADD) will have their last meeting of the year on Sunday, November 16, entitled "Aint Misbehaving: The Neurochemical Basis of ADHD" at 2-5 p.m.

The organization meets at Mifflin Presbyterian Church, 123 Granville Street, Gahanna. It is open to the public, and free to CHADD members. They do ask for a $5 donation for non-members attending to help offset the cost of refreshments and informational materials.

1:30 Registration
1:50 Welcome
2:00 Dr. Larry Binkovits, Nationwide Children's Hospital
3:00 Break out into support groups

Pre-register at Columbus-Ohio@CHADD.net

Noted by Dianne Garrett for Bexley Public Radio.

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as
WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM, Local Power Radio
2700 E. Main St., Suite 208
Columbus, OH 43209
Voice (614) 235 2929
Fax (614) 235 3008
Email wcrxlp@yahoo.com
Blog http://agentofcurrency.blogspot.com

Bexley Public Radio Foundation broadcasting as WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM is exempt from federal taxes under IRC Section 501(c)(3). Donations are deductible from federal income taxes for individuals who itemize. Checks may identify the payee as Bexley Public Radio Foundation WCRX-LP, 102.1 FM.

Design is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Bexley Public Radio Foundation. Text is copyright 2008. All rights reserved. Dianne Garrett.